Philadelphia Women’s March Draws Thousands

Protesters prepare for the Women’s March from Logan’s Square to the Ben Franklin Parkway minutes before it officially begins. (Photo: Taylor Allen)
Protesters prepare for the Women’s March from Logan’s Square to the Ben Franklin Parkway minutes before it officially begins. (Photo: Taylor Allen)

WRITTEN BY: TAYLOR ALLEN

Thousands of protesters showed up in droves for the Philadelphia Women’s March at Logan Square, Saturday at 10 a.m.

Although the focus was on women’s rights, the protest was also a direct response to the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Since the president is often criticized for his rhetoric, protestors came to show solidarity to women and other marginalized groups.

Kelly Colb, a Philadelphia mother, shares that while she is unsatisfied with the current political climate, she remains hopeful.

“We’re concerned about a lot of people we know and love not getting their rights anymore,” Colb said. “There’s people all coming together that we know and there’s people we’re just now meeting, all seeing that we’re not in this alone.”

Although most people at the Women’s March were fueled by their dissatisfaction with President Trump, many protesters simply want to see peace again. The national election caused division throughout the country, and now some wish to repair it.

Veteran Steven Spencer shared how much he wants solidarity among all people.

“I’m fearful for the country being divided more than it needs to be,” Spencer said. “I fought for it. I believe in justice for all and peace.”

Despite most people wishing for an alternative outcome to the election, these marchers remained positive for the future. Most of the signs that the marchers’ held showcased prominent feminist figures throughout history. A common chant was “progression, not oppression.”

Lindsay Hargrave, a volunteer for the Women’s March, expressed her fears about the possible repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and the possible defunding of Planned Parenthood. However, she also shared her gratitude for being around other like-minded people.

“[Feminism] to me, means the future,” Hargrave said. “The trend has been that things such as Civil Rights has always overcome, and I want to have a hand in propelling the future. I want to be voting for people around me who are doing great things.”

The main Women’s March was in Washington D.C. However, many major cities across the world, including L.A., Chicago, Boston, Paris, and London, also held marches, uniting feminists worldwide.


 

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