University continues sexual misconduct education, some students required to take online course

WRITTEN BY: JOSEPH WILLIAMS

Temple students may have recently noticed an e-mail from the Associate Vice President of Students Dr. Stephanie Ives. All second, third, and fourth year students, as well as graduate and professional students are required to complete an online course called, “Think About It: The Way Forward.” The course is meant to provide education on sexual misconduct to the Temple University community.

Campus Clarity (logo above) presents the course, "Think About It" as part of its training program regarding education on sexual misconduct. Temple students are required to complete the course by Dec. 1, 2015. (Photo courtesy of: Campus Clarity's official Twitter account @CampusClarity)
Campus Clarity (logo above) presents the course, “Think About It” as part of its training program regarding education and awareness of sexual misconduct on campus. Temple students are required to complete the course by Dec. 1, 2015. (Photo courtesy of: Campus Clarity’s official Twitter account @CampusClarity)

This course continues a trend that began with President Neil Theobald creating the campus committee on sexual misconduct last fall, and the creation of an entire website dedicated to the issue, as related to Temple’s campuses.

Ives detailed the course’s purpose in her initial e-mail to students.

“It is important to provide this type of education to you at different points throughout your college career. As you grow and develop through college, you face new opportunities and challenges all of the time,” said Ives.

“As your experiences broaden, it is beneficial to receive continuing education as you navigate different risks and strive to make healthy decisions.”

With the online course being mandatory, there are some questions as to whether it will have its intended impact.

Davone McCord a junior international business major is skeptical of student reaction to the course.

“I don’t think the students will really take it seriously,” said McCord.

“The only incentive in doing it is to avoid getting a hold placed on your account,” said McCord. “Students will try to breeze through it and just get it over with.”

Even though McCord is wary about the impact the course will have, he thinks it’s a step in the right direction.

“I think the university is doing the right thing, it’s just difficult to get the message across to so many people in just a 30 minute course.”

McCord suggested ways in which the university can do more to ensure a long-lasting impact is made on the students.

“Maybe in addition to the course have focus groups, or hold short events on-campus to increase awareness.”

Students required to take the course can complete it at their pace, but it must be completed before the deadline of Dec. 1, 2015.

 

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